Nantucket Severe Watches & Warnings NOAA Weather Radio

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Public Information Statement
Issued: 10:00 AM EDT Jul. 19, 2018 – National Weather Service

... Day 4 of hurricane preparedness week in southern New England...

The National Weather Service (nws) Boston, MA has declared July 16th
through July 20th as hurricane preparedness week. Each day this week
we will highlight a different preparedness topic.

The storm tide, inundation, can arrive several hours ahead of the
tropical cyclone eye, potentially resulting in the closure of
evacuation routes for an area. Even if the decision to leave is
made, it may no longer be possible to do so. Do not wait to leave if
asked to evacuate.

Be prepared to be self sufficient for at least three days up to one
week. This means having enough food, water and medicines for all
members of your family. If you have pets, do not Forget their needs
as well.

A hurricane strike in southern New England will disrupt normal
activities. There is the possibility for many roads to be closed due
to flooding, fallen trees or debris. Until the water recedes, or the
debris removed, it may not be possible to travel. That means no
trips to the grocery or convenience store, or restaurants for food
or drink. This also means emergency services, such as police, fire
and ambulance, may also be interrupted.

Electric and telephone services may be unavailable for days,
including cellular phones. Prior to the start of hurricane season,
it is a good idea to establish a common contact well away from the
east or south coasts. As the storm approaches, you can contact that
person to inform them that you have moved to a safe shelter. Family
and friends should know to contact that person to find out about
your well-being.

Putting together a disaster preparedness kit can be very expensive
if done all at once. Try building your kit slowly, by purchasing one
or two items per week.

A basic kit should contain at least,

* one gallon of water per person per day for drinking and sanitation
* non-perishable food and a manual can opener
* battery powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA all-hazards weather
radio - include extra batteries for each
* flashlights or lamps - include extra batteries
* first aid kit
* extra glasses and any medicines
* a whistle to signal for help
* a wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
* moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for sanitation
* local maps

Do not use candles or an open flame as a source of light after a
major storm.
Fire services will likely be disrupted, and a small fire could get
out of hand quickly. If there happens to be a natural gas leak
nearby or some kind of fuel in flood waters, a bad situation could
be made much worse.

Stay away from downed power lines. There is no advance notice when
power could return to the lines. Or, someone on the street could
have hooked up their portable generator improperly.

For more suggestions on what should go into a disaster kit, please
visit www.Ready.Gov/America/getakit. You could also visit the
website of your states emergency management agency or office of
public safety.

For more information concerning evacuation plans for hurricanes,
please visit the website of your states emergency management agency
or office of public safety. Other sources would be local emergency
management officials and fema.

For more information on the new storm surge watches and warnings
please visit www.NHC.NOAA.Gov

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
www.Weather.Gov/Boston

You can follow US on facebook at

1000 am EDT Thu Jul 19 2018

... Day 4 of hurricane preparedness week in southern New England...

The National Weather Service (nws) Boston, MA has declared July 16th
through July 20th as hurricane preparedness week. Each day this week
we will highlight a different preparedness topic.

The storm tide, inundation, can arrive several hours ahead of the
tropical cyclone eye, potentially resulting in the closure of
evacuation routes for an area. Even if the decision to leave is
made, it may no longer be possible to do so. Do not wait to leave if
asked to evacuate.

Be prepared to be self sufficient for at least three days up to one
week. This means having enough food, water and medicines for all
members of your family. If you have pets, do not Forget their needs
as well.

A hurricane strike in southern New England will disrupt normal
activities. There is the possibility for many roads to be closed due
to flooding, fallen trees or debris. Until the water recedes, or the
debris removed, it may not be possible to travel. That means no
trips to the grocery or convenience store, or restaurants for food
or drink. This also means emergency services, such as police, fire
and ambulance, may also be interrupted.

Electric and telephone services may be unavailable for days,
including cellular phones. Prior to the start of hurricane season,
it is a good idea to establish a common contact well away from the
east or south coasts. As the storm approaches, you can contact that
person to inform them that you have moved to a safe shelter. Family
and friends should know to contact that person to find out about
your well-being.

Putting together a disaster preparedness kit can be very expensive
if done all at once. Try building your kit slowly, by purchasing one
or two items per week.

A basic kit should contain at least,

* one gallon of water per person per day for drinking and sanitation
* non-perishable food and a manual can opener
* battery powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA all-hazards weather
radio - include extra batteries for each
* flashlights or lamps - include extra batteries
* first aid kit
* extra glasses and any medicines
* a whistle to signal for help
* a wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
* moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for sanitation
* local maps

Do not use candles or an open flame as a source of light after a
major storm.
Fire services will likely be disrupted, and a small fire could get
out of hand quickly. If there happens to be a natural gas leak
nearby or some kind of fuel in flood waters, a bad situation could
be made much worse.

Stay away from downed power lines. There is no advance notice when
power could return to the lines. Or, someone on the street could
have hooked up their portable generator improperly.

For more suggestions on what should go into a disaster kit, please
visit www.Ready.Gov/America/getakit. You could also visit the
website of your states emergency management agency or office of
public safety.

For more information concerning evacuation plans for hurricanes,
please visit the website of your states emergency management agency
or office of public safety. Other sources would be local emergency
management officials and fema.

For more information on the new storm surge watches and warnings
please visit www.NHC.NOAA.Gov

For the latest updates, please visit our webpage at
www.Weather.Gov/Boston

You can follow US on facebook at
www.Facebook.Com/nwsboston

536 PM EDT Wed Jul 18 2018

... NWS damage survey for 7/17/18 tornado in
eastern Connecticut...

Start location... Ashford in Windham County, CT
end location... Ashford in Windham County, CT
date... July 17 2018
estimated time... 400 PM EDT
maximum ef-scale rating... EF0
estimated maximum wind speed... 85 mph
maximum path width... 225 yards
path length... 0.4 miles
beginning lat/Lon... 41.8985/-72.1343
ending lat/Lon... 41.9004/-72.1267
* fatalities... 0
* injuries... 0

... Summary...
a National Weather Service team investigated damage in Windham
County, CT from the storms that occurred late Tuesday afternoon
(july 17). We concluded that a small tornado did occur in the
eastern part of the town of Ashford, CT, near the Eastford line.
Wind speeds were estimated at 80 to 85 mph, near the upper end
of the EF0 category of the Enhanced Fujita scale. The tornado
was only on the ground for 1 minute. It had a width of 225 yards
and a length of 0.4 miles.

Damage was mainly confined to a narrow area bounded by north Road
to the west and Ashford Lake to the east... and by Birchwood
drive to the north and Westview drive to the south.

In that area, numerous large trees were uprooted and many large
branches fell. Of significance was a subtle, yet distinct
convergence pattern of the fallen trees. On Birchwood drive,
trees fell toward the east-southeast, while on Westview drive,
trees fell more toward the east and east-northeast. We spoke with
a woman who lives right on the Lakeshore and she observed the
water in the lake to be sucked up 50 to 60 feet into the air.
Straight line winds would not cause that to happen. Many people
reported a very loud roaring sound and that it lasted less than
20 seconds. Most homes were spared damage, although we noted one
home on Birchwood drive which had shingles that appear to have
been shoved upward on one side of the roof. There were no
injuries during this event.

The National Weather Service in Norton, MA issued a Severe
Thunderstorm Warning for the Ashford area at 333 PM. It was
upgraded to a Tornado Warning at 359 PM.

The survey team also assessed isolated damage in the towns of
Putnam and Pomfret, also in Windham County. Our conclusion was
that the damage at those locations, which included a few downed
trees, tree limbs, and minor roof damage, was much weaker and
unrelated to the Ashford tornado.

The National Weather Service would like to thank the amateur
radio Skywarn spotters for their quick and accurate reporting
of damage on the exact streets in question and for providing
contact information for the eyewitness account of the lake water
rising. We would also like to extend our thanks to the Connecticut
department of emergency services and public protection's division
of emergency management and Homeland security, local emergency
managers, and to the local television media.

Ef scale: the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes into the
following categories:

EF0... weak... ... 65 to 85 mph
EF1... weak... ... 86 to 110 mph
EF2... strong... .111 to 135 mph
EF3... strong... .136 to 165 mph
EF4... violent... 166 to 200 mph
EF5... violent... >200 mph

* the information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

Field/dellicarpini


536 PM EDT Wed Jul 18 2018

... NWS damage survey for 7/17/18 tornado in
eastern Connecticut...

Start location... Ashford in Windham County, CT
end location... Ashford in Windham County, CT
date... July 17 2018
estimated time... 400 PM EDT
maximum ef-scale rating... EF0
estimated maximum wind speed... 85 mph
maximum path width... 225 yards
path length... 0.4 miles
beginning lat/Lon... 41.8985/-72.1343
ending lat/Lon... 41.9004/-72.1267
* fatalities... 0
* injuries... 0

... Summary...
a National Weather Service team investigated damage in Windham
County, CT from the storms that occurred late Tuesday afternoon
(july 17). We concluded that a small tornado did occur in the
eastern part of the town of Ashford, CT, near the Eastford line.
Wind speeds were estimated at 80 to 85 mph, near the upper end
of the EF0 category of the Enhanced Fujita scale. The tornado
was only on the ground for 1 minute. It had a width of 225 yards
and a length of 0.4 miles.

Damage was mainly confined to a narrow area bounded by north Road
to the west and Ashford Lake to the east... and by Birchwood
drive to the north and Westview drive to the south.

In that area, numerous large trees were uprooted and many large
branches fell. Of significance was a subtle, yet distinct
convergence pattern of the fallen trees. On Birchwood drive,
trees fell toward the east-southeast, while on Westview drive,
trees fell more toward the east and east-northeast. We spoke with
a woman who lives right on the Lakeshore and she observed the
water in the lake to be sucked up 50 to 60 feet into the air.
Straight line winds would not cause that to happen. Many people
reported a very loud roaring sound and that it lasted less than
20 seconds. Most homes were spared damage, although we noted one
home on Birchwood drive which had shingles that appear to have
been shoved upward on one side of the roof. There were no
injuries during this event.

The National Weather Service in Norton, MA issued a Severe
Thunderstorm Warning for the Ashford area at 333 PM. It was
upgraded to a Tornado Warning at 359 PM.

The survey team also assessed isolated damage in the towns of
Putnam and Pomfret, also in Windham County. Our conclusion was
that the damage at those locations, which included a few downed
trees, tree limbs, and minor roof damage, was much weaker and
unrelated to the Ashford tornado.

The National Weather Service would like to thank the amateur
radio Skywarn spotters for their quick and accurate reporting
of damage on the exact streets in question and for providing
contact information for the eyewitness account of the lake water
rising. We would also like to extend our thanks to the Connecticut
department of emergency services and public protection's division
of emergency management and Homeland security, local emergency
managers, and to the local television media.

Ef scale: the Enhanced Fujita scale classifies tornadoes into the
following categories:

EF0... weak... ... 65 to 85 mph
EF1... weak... ... 86 to 110 mph
EF2... strong... .111 to 135 mph
EF3... strong... .136 to 165 mph
EF4... violent... 166 to 200 mph
EF5... violent... >200 mph

* the information in this statement is preliminary and subject to
change pending final review of the event and publication in NWS
storm data.

Field/dellicarpini